27 Comments
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He had also strained his calf when he was with the Packers I believe back in 2016. I also believe it was on that same side that he recently tore.

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“Anatomy tells a story.”

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Saw a recent article saying they are shooting for a January return for the post season if they make it. Thoughts on turn around time?

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Sep 13, 2023Liked by John Quint

From all the information given so far, even if he technically wasn’t at Point B, when you have a 300lb defensive lineman chasing you down, is it realistic to say he could ever be truly prepared to handle those forces?

More specifically, there’s always going to be a chance of injury, and even if his rehab did everything possible to get the calf ready to play, could we ever truly mimic those same forces within a controlled training environment?

Genuinely asking because while I’ve trained a few pro athletes here and there, the bulk of my training experience is not with that population.

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author

I'd like to share some insights into how we currently manage the physical capacity of NFL linemen, focusing on their lower leg reactive strength. We understand that these athletes care going to experience large magnitudes of forces, often with complex force vectors, in the connective tissues of their lower legs. So, what's our training approach to mitigate injury?

In regards to the specific injury Rodgers sustained what we do is during the season, we continue with internal strength training, which includes two key means: ramping ME PAILs (Progressive Angular Isometric Loading) for the Achilles and overspeed eccentrics training in the belt squat. This is a weekly routine for the linemen.

In the belt squat exercise, we load 315 lbs of straight weight plus band tension. The load stays the same whereas the speed of the load (I.e., overspeed eccentric) is what we manipulate via waving band tension. To further challenge the connective tissues and subsequently train reactive strength, we incorporate hip and foot rotation plus lowering their bodies during marching. This stimulates the connective tissue to adapt and better handle the unique vector of forces they will encounter.

While there's more detail about the specific structure and timing of our training regimen, the key point to understand is that due the training of these lineman, we know they are capable of handling substantial loads and odd angles due to this specialized internal training - we know this based off the training environment.

Now, you might wonder if there's a limit to this approach - yes there of course there is a biological limit to how much force these tissues can absorb, dissipate, and counteract but as of now, we haven't discovered that upper limit - and let’s hope we never do find out.

I hope this example shows how we can use training as feedback to answer your question on can we truly ever mimic those same force in a controlled training environment.

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Sep 13, 2023Liked by John Quint

From Derek Hansen’s IG profile:

“Asked about the Jets’ pre-practice routine, which includes the use of medicine balls and pulling sleds, Rodgers said it's a first for him.

"I haven't done it before," he explained. "I haven't done it in 18 years. So but obviously there's

some science behind it."

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author

All external training - no specific internal strength training, right?

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Sep 13, 2023Liked by John Quint

Brad DeWeese, PhD is the team’s director of high performance. Prior experience was with the USOPC sports physiologist - more of a Track & Field guy. https://jetsxfactor.com/2021/03/11/new-york-jets-create-athletic-care-and-performance-department/

Very interesting how NFL teams vary with their approach to Strength Conditioning, Athletic Trainers, and Sports Meds.

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author

They vary their approach but they don't incorporate specific internal strength training.

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by Dr. Michael Chivers, John Quint

Is anyone familiar with this individual? What’s his backgrounds and expertise with training methodologies. He made the statement with confidence that improving CT can’t really be done to the point that it could’ve changed the outcome of the play.

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Individual in the video getting interviewed was a team physician for 17 years from my understanding.

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by Dr. Michael Chivers, John Quint

Watching the video of the injury a few times over, makes me kind sick to my stomach. Great conversation though!

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by Dr. Michael Chivers, John Quint
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Sep 12, 2023Liked by Dr. Michael Chivers, John Quint

Appears to the same leg that was injured in OTAs, according to thus article

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author

Nice find. It would be interesting to know what exactly he did to rehab and train that tissue, etc.

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author

It has been confirmed via MRI that Rodgers did indeed tear his Achilles. Too bad.

What is interesting is that the discussion revolves around the shortened preseason as a prevailing factor. Statistical cal probability of injury due to number of exposures would negate this argument.

Interesting that there is no detail around the previous calf injury or the training of it.

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by Dr. Michael Chivers, John Quint

Just watching the Pat Mcafee show and a former MD for NFL team spoke about the previous calf strain being a part of it. Right after though said there is no way to train the tissue to be able to accept more load. So seems to be a disconnect in training qualities. Host Pat Mcafee a former NFL player says hey doc figure it out how we can better prepare, so may be an outlet to bring some information out there to the sports world and public

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Thanks for the find Chad - I appreciate it. I just added the video you are referring to, to the post for anyone interested.

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As much as it is mind boggling that someone could say this, you are correct in that there is a huge opportunity for all of us to educate the masses about the need for more tissue specificity.

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by Dr. Michael Chivers, John Quint

Perhaps this is much like Burrows injury where as his off season training must have been sun- optimal regarding his connective tissues and obtaining point A going into game 1

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author

Agreed. The injury is no doubt be multifactorial with a high probability of suboptimal training being a contributing factor. It will be interesting to see if the "calf strain" during OTAs is the same side (left) as the current injury.

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by John Quint

Did I hear that he had a calf issue in training camp?

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author

There it is.

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author

Yes, you are correct. Rodgers suffered a "strained calf" during the Jet's OTA's back in May. Here is the article in which Rodgers told Rich Cimini of ESPN that he "tweaked" his calf and "I don't think it's too serious"...

Link: https://www.si.com/nfl/2023/05/23/aaron-rodgers-strained-camp-practice-tuesday

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by John Quint

It will be interesting to hear if it’s the same leg.

I’m not a mathematician, but it would also be interesting to calculating the amount of force going into his Achilles tendon at that moment. His body weight + the directional force change + lineman BW & directional force.

Seems obvious, based on QB calf area injuries, that either way, they’re not sufficiently training that area at/to length. For that matter, most athletes are not.

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Sep 12, 2023Liked by John Quint

I was just going to ask how much did the calf injury, if any, did that play in the likely hood of the tear?

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author

Good question. Last night Rodger's injured his left lower extremity (see video), but I am not sure which calf he strained during OTAs.

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